Get Ready for the WildStar Online Adventure

Wildstar will be opened around Augest 2013. Game players from all over the world are

waiting for this awesome game to come out, and some of them even say that have saved

a lot of money to buy wildstar gold already.

What is your feeling to wildstar online? Some players say it is a very wild game.
The game is pretty much promising players all sorts of revolutionary concepts that

are certain to sweep the style of MMOs today as we know it! The game sticks with

traditional WASD keyboard controls and is certain to be chock full of quests,

dungeons, and PVP combat. As the developers say: it works well, so why break it? But

unlike most MMORPGs, Wildstar has double-jumping! Neat! Also, one of the staples of

the game is called “telegraphs.” This means that, when engaged in fight, both

players and enemies will have zones displayed around them that allow for timing and

navigating away.

The four available selections are the soldier, the explorer, the settler, and the

scientist. The soldier is all about killing stuff. Pretty simple! Soldiers will set

up a holdout and defend it from swarms of enemies or test out advanced military

hardware. If you choose a soldier, you’ll also get to act as a hit man or perform

rescue ops. The explorer goes all over the map.

As a settler, you’ll be expanding settlements and doing a bit of infrastructure.

Settlers can improve towns and set up supply caches for other players to use. Last,

but not least, we have the scientist. From my impressions, the scientist seems to be

a bit lore-centric, finding out about the origins of the planet you’re on as well

examining its inhabitants. You’ll be analyzing plants and alien compounds as well!

There’s so much more that makes this game look more and more promising. Needless to

say.I love it and I will purchase wildstar powerleveling once the game is really live

because I want to become the first one who will get the highest level in the game.

WildStar The Summer of WildStar is Upon Us

Carbine Studios’ WildStar is gaining more and more steam in the hearts and minds of expectant MMO gamers as it drives through Closed Beta on its way to launching later this year.  Mixing the traditions of theme-park MMOs with the sensibilities of play-how-you want sandbox MMOs, WildStar seems like it’s poised to please a lot of gamers when it finally does launch. That is, if they can make good on all of the design principles and promises they hold so dearly… because lordy, if they do pull it all off? Carbine’s flagship title is going to be a world rife with fun for just about every MMO player out there.  We caught up with Executive Producer Jeremy Gaffney to find out how Closed Beta 1 has gone, and what’s coming up in Closed Beta 2 and beyond.
WildStar
Carbine Studios is ramping up coverage of WildStar, a game that is beginning to look like a genre changer. We spent a long while speaking with Jeremy Gaffney and have a tome of new information to share. Read on and then tell us what you think in the comments.

Carbine Studios’ WildStar is gaining more and more steam in the hearts and minds of expectant MMO gamers as it drives through Closed Beta on its way to launching later this year.  Mixing the traditions of theme-park MMOs with the sensibilities of play-how-you want sandbox MMOs, WildStar seems like it’s poised to please a lot of gamers when it finally does launch. That is, if they can make good on all of the design principles and promises they hold so dearly… because lordy, if they do pull it all off? Carbine’s flagship title is going to be a world rife with fun for just about every MMO player out there.  We caught up with Executive Producer Jeremy Gaffney to find out how Closed Beta 1 has gone, and what’s coming up in Closed Beta 2 and beyond.

Carbine Studios is ramping up coverage of WildStar, a game that is beginning to look like a genre changer. We spent a long while speaking with Jeremy Gaffney and have a tome of new information to share. Read on and then tell us what you think in the comments.

WildStar All About Paths

Picking a Class is choosing the way you like to fight. Are you a gunslinger, a squishy healer, or meatshield? Picking your Path is choosing your playstyle. Do you like to explore dangerous places, kill enemies, or study things? Make a choice, and we’ll make sure you get lots of what you like.
WildStar
The WildStar site has been updated with brand spanking new information about the Path system in the game. Players will be able to choose from Soldier, Explorer, Settler or Scientist paths, all of which are brilliantly explained in great graphics and a pair of terrific videos.

What is the difference between a class and a path?

Picking a Class is choosing the way you like to fight. Are you a gunslinger, a squishy healer, or meatshield? Picking your Path is choosing your playstyle. Do you like to explore dangerous places, kill enemies, or study things? Make a choice, and we’ll make sure you get lots of what you like.

The WildStar site has been updated with brand spanking new information about the Path system in the game. Players will be able to choose from Soldier, Explorer, Settler or Scientist paths, all of which are brilliantly explained in great graphics and a pair of terrific videos.

WildStar The Luminai Detailed

The first and most famous of all the Luminai was Dominus the Half-Blood, who arrived on planet Cassus in the year 1 AE. Dominus was created by the Eldan on planet Nexus, using the genetic information of the famed Cassian Sword-Maiden Tresayne Toria. After his long-awaited arrival, Dominus was welcomed with open arms by his new people and crowned the first emperor of the newly established Dominion. Blessed with the strength and courageousness of his legendary mother, the Half-Blood was beloved by the people of Cassus, and his reign is considered the Dominion’s golden age.
WildStar
The highest nobility in the Dominion are those citizens called the Luminai. The latest WildStar Wednesday takes a look at who these rare and elite creatures are and fills in the lore behind their existence.

The first and most famous of all the Luminai was Dominus the Half-Blood, who arrived on planet Cassus in the year 1 AE. Dominus was created by the Eldan on planet Nexus, using the genetic information of the famed Cassian Sword-Maiden Tresayne Toria. After his long-awaited arrival, Dominus was welcomed with open arms by his new people and crowned the first emperor of the newly established Dominion. Blessed with the strength and courageousness of his legendary mother, the Half-Blood was beloved by the people of Cassus, and his reign is considered the Dominion’s golden age.

The highest nobility in the Dominion are those citizens called the Luminai. The latest WildStar Wednesday takes a look at who these rare and elite creatures are and fills in the lore behind their existence.

WildStar The Economic Game Plan

Basically, we as designers already know that earning resources is a fun experience. However, because we need to tame inflation, we must also find a way to make using resources fun. Our goal is to turn the use and reacquisition of resources (especially currency) into a way fun and interesting way to learn about economics. We want the players to learn about resource management by making meaningful choices about things they have earned in the game.

WildStar’s site has been updated with a new blog post to lay out the plans for the game economy. Among other things, the team plans to give players a wide variety of ways to spend their money and to obtain some, but not all, of the things they want with immediacy.

Basically, we as designers already know that earning resources is a fun experience. However, because we need to tame inflation, we must also find a way to make using resources fun. Our goal is to turn the use and reacquisition of resources (especially currency) into a way fun and interesting way to learn about economics. We want the players to learn about resource management by making meaningful choices about things they have earned in the game.

And we really do want you to make meaningful choices. We want to give you enough currency that you can have some of things that you want, but not everything. You will need to make choices about how you spend your money according to what is important to you. You will need to plan to purchase things by saving or through the magic of capitalism and the markets. When you master saving your money, or master using the markets to fulfill other people’s desires, you will have had fun in the process because you’ve learned.

WildStar Closed Beta 3 Patch Notes Released

Carbine Studios has released the patch notes for the next phase of the WildStar closed beta. Players will be able to take part in two-faction PvP though the team warns that this is a time for discovering effective griefing/ganking methods. In addition, players will have a new off-planet zone called Farside to travel to as well as the new Halls of the Bloodsworn battleground. Last among the biggest additions, players will be able to check out rated Battlegrounds and Arenas to see who is best of the best.

Carbine has also issued a laundry list of bug fixes and additions, most notably in the social features that include the ability to add to friends/rivals/ignored lists, the addition of housing neighbors and the availability of all races’ housing models.

The Rivals list is indeed unique. Players can add anyone of any faction to their personal Rivals List. Those players can be marked in the open world with a special symbol to assist in tracking them down for elimination or dueling.

You can read the full and very lengthy patch notes on the WildStar site.

Friends List
Add favorite people from your faction to the list to spy on them and keep an eye on their whereabouts.
Friend requests must be approved by the person you’re attempting to add. Click the lock button in the upper left of the Friends UI in order to enable/disable friend requests.
Rivals List
Rivals may be added from either faction.
Anyone on your Rivals List can be marked in the open world with a unique visual representation. Use this to track down nemeses of the opposite faction, or duel with one of your favorite friends!
Ignore List
Add naughty Nexians to your Ignore list in order to make sure you never hear from them.
Suggested Friends
This list is automatically generated as you interact with other players in the open world. Accidentally left the dungeon run before friending the tank? Pop-up this list to find them again!

Not so wild about WildStar

WildStar’s promising players the moon, but are gamers just star-struck? I know I personally wasn’t paying too much attention to the game until the recent video about paths. I’m not against the graphics, I think themeparks can be fun, and I’ve put up with PvE vs. PvP stats for about a decade and a half, so what’s another year? But… well, I just keep getting the feeling that there’s a lot of hype and no substance. The path video and the scientist path hands-on preview got me excited though. No longer were these empty promises! Someone had seen some of them first-hand! But maybe this was my downfall.

For those who don’t know, E3 isn’t about playing any game you want any way you want. Sometimes devs just bring the live game and let you have at it, but I find that often these games don’t have a lot of announcements to make and are mainly there to let… ah, “less informed” gaming journalists see the game. No, instead, you often have a developer leading you on a very strict path, if you’re even allowed to play the game. Maybe they release you with a premade character into a specific dungeon that “ends” when the boss dies. Or, as with my hands on with Wildstar, you might be restricted to a few class/paths and have to do the newbie experience.

Now, this can be good, especially with players who don’t know MMOs well. I had a young woman standing next to me who didn’t know a MOB from a muppet, and the idea of a map that shows you where your quest takes place is a feature just for her. That’s fine! It’s good to teach people how to play your game. The problem for me was that I know a bit about WildStar. I know who the Dominion are, I know there are two races we haven’t learned about, and I haven’t heard about a full hands-on with the settler yet. I was sadly stuck with known races, classes, and paths.

First, played a Cassian spellslinger that followed the explorer path. I was put on a planet and given the usual assortment of MMO stuff. I’ll be blunt: I thought I was playing World of Warcraft with Guild Wars 2’s combat with bad controls. There, I said it. I don’t mind WoW’s graphics or humor, and I’m sure the yellow exclamation marks will help themepark veterans orient themselves, but as a seasoned MMOer, I was a bit let down. I had the usual speak/click/kill/collect type quests, and it was just not something I was able to get into. I was literally doing this in at least five other games today. I did appreciate the combat, but not the controls, and being unable to remap keys during the demo probably added to my frustration.

More on that later, though. My spellslinger had style. She shot guns to cast spells, so that was fun to watch. If things got too hairy, I could teleport away, which stunned my enemies. Heck, just for fun, I double-jumped off buildings and teleported in mid-air. It was just cool to do. But I run around and kill things in almost every game. I’ve been a newbie a million times. I wanted to see something new, so I decided I’d stop doing quests from NPCs and try the “path” thing out.

WildStar dreaming

The takeaway here is that WildStar really is a combat-centered game. I know it’s not a shock to many people, but I also know there are prospective players dreaming about being a pure Settler and maintaining a town, so hopefully this helps those people understand that Carbine isn’t building that sort of game.

Still, there are lots of different ways to do combat. When I asked what precisely about the game’s combat is meant to attract MMO players as opposed to a console player, Carbine’s devs explained that the game’s combat is supposed to feel like the “next step in MMO combat.” They want people to be engaged, move around, “not sipping a coke.” While the game’s combat borrows from “action, consoley type games,” it’s “made for the MMO market, so it’s not quite as complex as other console games but [instead] adds something to the MMO space that hasn’t been seen before.”

The closed beta NDA is still in effect, but I asked whether the team could relate some stories about player creations in beta. We’ve heard about space for creation in housing, but unfortunately, Carbine isn’t quite ready to show off player-designed homes just yet. I was told that players are, however, enjoying the dungeons, which the team says feel like high-level dungeons in other games. In fact, the player testers have already found interesting ways to break these dungeons, but for obvious reasons, Carbine wasn’t spilling the beans on how.

One last highlight for those of you interested in guilds and warplots: When I asked whether PvP guilds can undertake warplots without raiding and whether the game will include guild levels, I was told that “although guilds and warplots work together well, they aren’t exclusive to one another; there will be guild stuff that has nothing to do with warplots, and there will be warplot stuff that has nothing to do with guild stuff.”

There’ll be a big reveal about these one day, but that day just isn’t today. Maybe you’ll get lucky at PAX!

Chatting with Team WildStar

Massively returned to the WildStar demos at E3 on Thursday to chat one last time with the team from Carbine. As we noted in yesterday’s Q&A article, Carbine had already declared it wasn’t making any big announcements at E3. It always intended a low-key presence, sharing a booth hosted by Alienware and offering the same demo gamers are at PAX East, just brought to the west coast.
WildStar
Why Alienware? WildStar runs really great on a laptop.

Good news, though: Carbine plans to have a big WildStar presence at Gamescom and PAX, and the team is working on demos that will show new content, new races, and new classes.

Now, for me personally, the paths were what caught my attention with WildStar. A themepark game with some sandbox elements is cool; it seems like the other side of ArcheAge, which looks to be a sandbox game with some themepark elements. But maybe that comparison isn’t fair. When I asked why path gameplay couldn’t just be combined with regular leveling, Carbine reps explained that paths are supposed to complement the game’s combat, not supplant it. We’re not supposed to be leveling just by exploring or gathering lore. The option for that sort of gameplay is there, but it’s supposed to be only an option, kind of like crafting. Still, 25-33% of a zone’s content being devoted to paths isn’t too bad, especially if you have friends following other paths to help you experience what those other paths have to offer. But if you were hoping to level up by making potions or exploring, WildStar might not be your game, unless things change dramatically in beta. The closed beta feedback is taken very seriously, so if people don’t like something about the paths, Carbine freely admits it is willing to change the system.

Carbine also doesn’t want a single player to be able to do everything; it wants to encourage socialization with interdependencies. Consider classic Darkfall, in which players were just mastering every skill, which really made it obvious who had been playing the game for a while and who was new. In fact, Darkfall dropped its completely open skill system when it launched Unholy Wars to prevent players from becoming an all-powerful wizard while also shooting a bow. The game does still allow players to level up through content like exploring and gathering. While I was told this sort of system was technically feasible, it’s just not what Carbine wants to do. The WildStar devs say they are “trying to force people to make choices” so that each path is as unique as possible and so that players feel that each fresh character has a fresh experience, which is good for replay value.

WildStar Nexus Telegraph

Free-to-play
There are two approaches to free-to-play, but in this case I’m using the Lineage II model: You pay no money to start and aren’t able to opt in with a subscription. This is not nearly common as the more frequently seen alternative, but I’ll get around to that.
Not a hybrid model, technically.
Fully free-to-play definitely has its advantages, starting with the fact that it encourages everyone to come in without any need to pay a dime. It’s also an accepted part of the industry standard at this point. The downside, of course, is that it means that the game is almost by necessity designed to separate you from your cash as fast as realistically possible. It’s also a dicey launch prospect, since you could much more easily launch to rave reviews and wonderful numbers with zero sales.

If WildStar heads down this road, expect some built-in roadblocks, probably related to transport or leveling speed. That doesn’t seem in keeping with the game’s overall philosophy, but it could be made to work with a little wrestling. Honestly, though, I think this is the least likely option for the business model. It’s something most frequently found in imported games, and most western games that launch or convert to free-to-play opt for a hybrid model.

Hybrid model
The standard hybrid model can be found, well, everywhere now. It’s quickly becoming the model of choice for games, partly since many of them started out as subscription games that mostly added additional options. If you want to play for free, you can, or you can subscribe and get some of the otherwise paid benefits for free along with a small stipend of cash-shop currency.

Those who loathe cash shops loathe this model as well. Those who enjoy having cosmetic options frequently enjoy it. For my money, it’s probably my favorite option, even though I inevitably wind up subscribing as a matter of course. And it’s not something usually touted on launch, instead generally being the result of a game losing early subscribers and thus broadening its horizons.

This would certainly be a way for WildStar to distinguish itself, although I find myself wondering how many people would treat it as a free title from the start without the roadblocks you might find in purely free games. It’d be a novel launch but possibly not an entirely successful one, and there would be some definite rocky patches to be hammered out.

Subscription
Yes, I saved this for last. It’s a dying breed, and as I’ve argued before, launching into the modern MMO environment as a subscription game is a bit like launching a new game for the Super Nintendo at the $60 price point. It’s something you can do, but you’re competing in a market that has largely moved on to other options.

Still, it’s also the most common launch model for new games developed on this side of the pond. And since WildStar has been in development for a while, I can’t help but think that this is the most likely model for when the game launches.

Honestly? Expect a conversion if this is how WildStar launches. Probably about a year after launch, but it’ll still happen. There’s just too much riding on the game trying to get market traction, and a subscription creates a barrier in the modern environment that might be too much to overcome. That’s something I’m sure the team is aware of, but there’s a lot of pressure to be the next big subscription success at the same time.

So how will it actually launch? I don’t know. But I don’t see a subscription lasting, and I don’t see a purely free-to-play launch as being likely. That leaves a narrow range of options.